Sinking to Move (2) – Connecting the Upper Body

Sinking to Move (1) was about sinking the qi from the waist downwards. Sinking to Move (2) is about connecting the upper body to the lower body.
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How NOT to sink a weight

If you sink only from the waist downwards, but leave the shoulders and torso tense, this is like throwing a stone into a pond with a balloon attached, and wondering why the stone doesn’t sink.

Two examples from the Yang 24-Step Form of using the limbs to help sinking

1) Play the Lute.  When you move from the 3rd Brush Knee & Twist Step into Play the Lute, the left palm plays an important role in helping the qi to sink in the upper body. When the rear foot (the right foot) is about to come off the floor for the half-step forwards, push the heel of the left palm downwards (the left shoulder also relaxing and dropping).
As the right toes start to lift from the floor, transfer the press in the left hand from the heel of the palm, via the metacarpophalangeal joints (the joints where the palm meets the fingers), to the tips of the fingers… in other words the fingers will end up pointing at the floor.  There is a continuous sensation of pushing downwards, but with increasing softness as the energy reaches the tips of the fingers – as though the energy is dissipating.
This connects the upper body to the lower.

2) Repulse Monkey. At the moment of 172 Taiji Parkreleasing the front foot from the floor (in order to step backwards), feel the elbow of the forward arm (which is rotating downwards) connect (metaphorically) to the opposite knee.  This is a brief connection because, after that, the left elbow works with the left hip.
So, for example, if you start from Play the Lute (Strum the Pippa), you open the arms to the right, and the left elbow will (again, metaphorically) connect to the the right knee as you lift your left foot from the floor in order to step backwards.
If you do this, all of a sudden, your elbow start to work with the hips.

Using the upper body to create free movement
If you are attempting to sink the qi to create ‘free’ movement (i.e. movement that is unrestricted and uncompromised by other parts of the body), the upper body needs to join in with the sinking.
The problems are almost always caused by the shoulders being ‘held up’.  When this happens, the upper limbs can no longer function effectively.  Once the shoulders have stopped ‘holding on,’ the qi is no longer held in the upper body when you need it to sink; the balloon bursts and the stone can drop to the bottom of the pond.
Then the sense of cross-body connection can function (e.g.) from right elbow to left knee, or from right shoulder to left hip, etc.

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One thought on “Sinking to Move (2) – Connecting the Upper Body

  1. Tony Stewart

    Excellent article James. I enjoyed and fully agree with your text = nice one! Its the classics of where theres a down and were there is a front there is a back movement. I also teach the energy principle of what i call the balloon effect that is to express that when moving back there is a gentle forward mindfulness in the tips of the fingers et all I tell them you are now just stepping back! Repluse the monkey! As we deal with real life monkeys your text apply s too! 🙂 I often tell students how as the hands come past the shoulder and side of face it is also clearing the monkey thoughts we all to often hold on too..Anyway loving to connect with you and hope you are well and enjoy all happy chi and keeping well. Cheers n happy chi from Tony and all at Tai Chi 4 You over here in Holland.

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