Tag Archives: posture

Revolving Doors

Revolving doors work because they have perfect central equilibrium, and therefore use minimum energy.
Gravity settles them into their single pivotal point, and because they’re perfectly balanced both vertically and horizontally, rotation is a smooth and effortless event.

In movement, we are aiming, as far as possible, to emulate that feeling, noticing that when one side of us turns one way, the other side turns the other way, and that each side of us is perfectly balanced.  In other words, we are trying to feel the whole of our personal universe revolving in space whilst being subject to gravity.

“For every action there is …”
Tai chi and qigong are Newton’s 3rd Law of Motion in action. Usually we only notice the most obvious limb doing some work, forgetting about the rest of our body, but when doing Tai Chi or Qigong we are trying to be aware of all sides of our body simultaneously.  We are looking for perfect architectural balance.

Getting it.
And then, once in a while you ‘get it’, and you know that you’ve ‘got it’.  You don’t forget that feeling of perfection in movement, and you attempt to find it again and again.  Everything worked beautifully – your movement was light and easy, you felt totally grounded, your balance was superb, and you just know that your personal universe functioned exactly as it should do.  The movement took no effort and felt seamless and unified.  All those separate instructions for arms, legs, hands, feet, & body blurred into one like pieces of a 3-dimensional jigsaw.
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James Drewe teaches Taijiquan and qigong in both London and in Kent. Details of weekly classes can be found on the website, and there are classes for 2-person Taijiquan on one Saturday a month.

CONTACTS:
http://www.taiji.co.uk
http://www.qigonghealth.co.uk
Email: taijiandqigong@gmail.com
Phone: 07836-710281 or 020-8883 3308

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Song Yao / Kai Kua

Further to the previous blog…
Song Yao” = Release the waist (see previous blog on ‘Song’).
Kai Kua” = Open the Kua, or inguinal region on the front of the pelvis.

Yao’ in this case refers specifically to the back of the waist (exactly as in the previous blog).
Kua’ refers to the area on each side of the hips where the legs join the pelvis at the front of the body – the ‘Inguinal Groove’.  To feel it, do a semi-squat (it doesn’t have to be very deep), and then open your knees sideways.

Open the knees (or Kua).
The under-rotation of the pelvis cannot work very effectively without the Kua opening.  This is easy to feel if you try the opposite… Try tucking the tip of your tailbone (coccyx) further under, but simultaneously squeeze your knees together.
Once you’ve felt how awkward that is, you know to consciously open the knees gently as you release the back (Song Yao), tucking under as a result, – although it’s better to think of it as the Kua, rather than the knees, opening.

Avoiding ‘collapsing knee’ syndrome.
This means that whether you are in a Bow stance (with the weight on the forward leg as in the photos), or sitting back on to your rear leg (Empty stance), you need to ensure that the Kua opens. In a Bow stance it will be the Kua on the back leg in particular, and in the Empty stance, it will be the Kua on the front leg.
This avoids the collapsing knee syndrome (as in the photo on the right) that is so common amongst beginners practising tai chi and qigong.

Whatever posture you’re in…
… when you pelvic tilt (Song Yao), always release the front of the pelvis (Kai Kua).
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James Drewe teaches Taijiquan and Qigong in both London and in Kent.  Details of weekly classes can be found on the website, and there are classes for 2-person Taijiquan one Saturday a month.

CONTACT:
http://www.taiji.co.uk
http://www.qigonghealth.co.uk
Email: taijiandqigong@gmail.com
Phone: 07836-710281 or 020-8883 3308

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Tucking Under… Don’t FORCE it.

The mechanics.
When you sit down on to a chair, you automatically, and without forcing it, do a pelvic tilt.  If you don’t, you run the slight risk of hurting your spine.
The same thing should be true in tai chi and qigong when you move your weight from the front leg to the rear leg of a Bow stance; you need to do a pelvic tilt (see previous blog).

Forcing it.
Without repeating the previous blog, I’ve noticed that quite a few people force the pelvis under rather than allowing it to roll under by releasing the back and the neck.  If you don’t release the muscles in the back, you’re just creating further tension and the movement won’t function as effectively if someone were to push or pull you at the same time.
This relates to the question that people sometimes ask – How do you relax the gluteus muscles in the buttocks at same time as tucking under?

Stretching or releasing?
If you force the pelvic tilt, you are deliberately trying to stretch the lower back muscles by contracting the abdominal muscles.  Forcing it means that the movement is coming from only one place, and the back isn’t joining in the game – or only slightly. 
If you force the pelvis under, the neck doesn’t release, and the tension within the pelvis may even cause the chin to lift because the entire back, including the back of the neck, contracts.
In fact, to go a stage further, when tucking the pelvis under, your neck should release at precisely the same moment.

Feeeeeel……
When you release the back, as opposed to ‘forcing’ it, the sensation of release occurs throughout the entire back – the waist, the ribcage (sides and back), the armpits, the shoulder blades, the neck, and even in the back of the head and up to the crown of the head.  Your back should feel like a compressed spring releasing.
Should you release the neck or the back first?  Both; it’s all one and the same.

How does the front of the body behave?
When you release the back, the muscles at the front feel as though they are being drawn upwards and inwards, rather than tensed.
What happens is that the back ‘opens’ – not exactly a bowing backwards, more a sensation of the cellular structure undoing and opening, and the front of the body ‘closes’, – a feeling of the front drawing in, compressing.  These events happen simultaneously so that one reinforces the other.
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James Drewe teaches Taijiquan and qigong in both London and in Kent. Details of weekly classes can be found on the website, and there are classes for 2-person Taijiquan one Saturday a month.

CONTACT:
http://www.taiji.co.uk
http://www.qigonghealth.co.uk
Email: taijiandqigong@gmail.com
Phone: 07836-710281 or 020-8883 3308

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The Breathing of Movement in Tai Chi & Qigong.

Walking & ‘Open/Close’.
If you picture your body as a mobile vertical line, what allows you to be mobile is your ability to split that line at the base – in other words, you have legs.
You can move a leg forwards or backwards thereby temporarily fraying the vertical line from the pelvis downwards.
If you stay as a vertical line you are static, and if you stay as a frayed line you are static; your ability for movement is caused by your alternating the two options.
There aren’t any other possibilities apart from hopping up and down on the spot.
So when mobile, you constantly change between a closed and an open position – as you push off one leg, leaving it behind, you advance with the other leg, before again bringing the legs back together prior to repeating the whole event.
Of course, it doesn’t feel that way; we don’t really notice when the legs come back together again. It feels as though our legs are constantly split in the process of walking, perhaps because the weight is only on one foot as the advancing rear leg moves forwards with the intention of taking a further step.
The process is therefore a constant expansion away from the vertical axis, and contraction towards the vertical axis, which is the basis of both tai chi and qigong.

The arms when walking & ‘Open/Close’.
The arms do the same thing; they swing forwards and backwards as you walk.  Usually this is unconscious although it obviously doesn’t have to be.  They expand away from the vertical line before coming back to it only to move again in the opposite direction.

Opposite shoulder turns to opposite hip (‘Open/Close’).
If you step forward with your left foot, as you put your weight on to it (prior to stepping through with the other foot), your centre-line (sternum to navel) will turn towards that left foot
•  1) because you are pushing off the rear right foot, which therefore turns your hip to the left,
•  2) because the turn to the left stabilises the vertical line over the weighted foot, and
•  3) because the right leg which (hopefully) is attached to the right hip, which is turning, will be brought forwards for the next step.
As a result of the turn of the body to the left, the waist will also turn with shoulders naturally following, the arms therefore following the shoulders.
In other words, the arms do exactly the same as the legs (but in opposition).  Both the arms and legs return equally to the vertical axis before starting again with the opposite limb.

Experiencing the body turn.
To feel this movement of arms and body clearly, you only need to put on a heavy rucksack and walk.  The rucksack accentuates the body movement, and you will feel it swinging from side to side with the turn of the body; the body turn towards the advancing leg therefore becomes very obvious.  It’s this twisting of the body inwards as the pressure moves on to the advancing foot that is the body seeking the vertical line.

Compared to …
As a further walking experiment, try walking without turning the hips or shoulders at all.  All the movement is then coming from the legs; you can walk quite fast, but not as fast as when using the body correctly – mainly because your steps become much shorter.  When you start to watch people walking, you can see that a lot of people move that way, particularly those with no flexibility in the waist.

How does this relate to tai chi and qigong?
There’s a reluctance to move the body when people do tai chi and qigong.  All that arm and leg movement looks as though the limb movements are the main point.  In reality, in tai chi and qigong, all movement is governed by the way that you use your torso; the arms move because the torso moves, your balance is maintained because you use the torso … it’s all there in the everyday action of walking.
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James Drewe teaches Taijiquan and qigong in both London and in Kent. Details of weekly classes can be found on the website, and there are classes for 2-person Taijiquan one Saturday a month.

CONTACT:
http://www.taiji.co.uk
http://www.qigonghealth.co.uk
Email: taijiandqigong@gmail.com
Phone: 07836-710281 or 020-8883 3308

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Flapping Around in Tai Chi & Qigong.

Copying movements.
When seeing Tai Chi or Qigong for the first time, it appears that all those graceful movements are the result of moving our limbs into the ‘correct’ position.  So in order to learn those arts, we attempt to emulate the movements as precisely as possible.

The art of precision.
I know this because I spent many years being an exponent of this way of learning as precisely as possible:
Make sure you slip your heel to 45 degrees.
Is your wrist precisely level with your shoulder?
Step forward and push your arms ahead of you.
Are your fingertips level with the tip of your nose?
… and so on; in other words, instructions for the body parts.
On the other hand, if you don’t learn that way, it’s very difficult to learn anything; you need a structure to play around with.

Once upon a time…
In the olden days (whatever they are), the teacher would spend weeks on one move only, refining and polishing it until it was as near perfect as possible.  Nowadays students don’t have the patience, they want a ‘product’, something that they can take home with them.
I don’t have a problem with this, but it means changing the method of teaching.  The superficial is taught first, and then honed.

Approaching the matter.
About 8 years ago, I had a student who, having been with me for several years, one day said to me, “You keep on changing it; you used to tell us to do it this way.”
On paper, this makes it sound as though this particular move had become unrecognisable, which of course it hadn’t, but the focus was different, and a movement that she thought that she’d ‘sorted out’ had now become uncomfortably flexible again.

Change.
However, a number of things had happened since she had first learnt the move:
1) Her tai chi had reached the point where the basic shapes weren’t enough, so she needed more information, and
2) My own understanding had developed and I had different ways of explaining things from additional perspectives.
My student also wanted a finished product that she could bag up and take home, which is exactly how I used to think about tai chi;  I had the “there is only one way to do it and this is the correct way” syndrome.
…She eventually left.

It’s the connection.
It’s the Qi connection  that really counts.
Yes, you might to certain extent be able to be precise about the position of arms and legs, but at the end of the day it’s how you are feeling inside that’s the main thing.
This feeling is an over-all sensation of unity.
It’s as though your body were a medieval castle and you need the infrastructure within the walls to be very efficient.  When it’s working well you are protected on all sides effectively.
This has nothing to do with your being tense or hard, more a feeling that the supply lines between all the walls are working smoothly and to maximum efficiency.  (In Tai Chi this includes above you and below you also).

When one part moves…
My rather clumsy castle analogy comes down to the fact that, gradually you become more and more aware of how your body is knitting itself together during the movements.  The result of this is that you’ve never really finished learning tai chi or qigong because there are always new discoveries to be made.
This comes down to the paraphrased saying that “when one part (of you) moves, every part moves”.  Every part knows what the other part is doing; nothing is hanging around waiting.  When something happens in one part of the body, it is reflected in all other parts.  This is the 8 energies and the Principles in practice
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James Drewe teaches Taijiquan and qigong in both London and in Kent.  Details of weekly classes can be found on the website, and there are classes for 2-person Taijiquan one Saturday a month.

CONTACT:
http://www.taiji.co.uk
http://www.qigonghealth.co.uk
Email: taijiandqigong@gmail.com
Phone: 07836-710281 or 020-8883 3308

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Qigong – Why all the Stretching & Twisting?

Leaving aside ‘Standing’ qigong (aka Zhan Zhuang, Standing Pole, Standing Like a Tree , etc.), there are many types of Qigong which are not unlike very short and repetitive Tai Chi Forms.
These exercises quite simply move the body from a static, usually feet-together position, into a particular posture, and then out if it again, not unlike some yoga exercises.

Professor Zhang Guangde’s qigong ‘sets’.
The type of qigong that I am focusing on for the purpose of this blog is Daoyin Yangsheng Gong, compiled and constructed by Professor Zhang Guangde, whom I’ve had the privilege of working with on a couple of occasions in China.
In this type of qigong, there are sets – usually there are 8 or 9 exercises per set, and some of the sets focus on specific organs in the body.  For example there are sets for the Heart, Lungs, Spleen & Stomach, Kidneys, Liver, as well as sets for Diabetes and many ‘General Health’ sets.
Professor Zhang is a TCM practitioner and all of his qigong sets of exercises are based around the principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine.

Digestive system qigong.
For example, the set of exercises for the Spleen and Stomach work not only on the spleen and stomach acupuncture meridians but, based on 5 Elements theory, also work on other organs, in particular the Heart and the Lungs.
This isn’t too surprising really, because the organs that pair with the Heart and the Lungs are the Small Intestines and Large Intestines, both of which are part of the digestive system.

The purpose of Daoyin YangSheng Gong.
Because the exercises are based on TCM, they are a wholistic approach to health.  Using the example of the Stomach/Spleen set,  the movements are in fact about balancing all the organs of the body so that they wor
k as a harmonious whole, but with an emphasis on the Digestive system.  One way in which this idea is put into practise is by making use of the theory of 5 Elements  (wood, fire, earth, metal, water) which explains how one organ directly affects or influences another.

How do the exercises work?
By means of twisting, stretching, pulling, pressing, and even hitting the body on specific acupuncture points, energy is moved and redistributed in the body.

A brief intro to ‘5 Element theory’.
To give a brief example using the Spleen/Stomach again, in 5 Elements theory these two organs take the role of ‘Earth’.   The order of the 5 Elements is Wood, Fire, Earth, Metal, Water.  ‘Earth’ lies between ‘Fire’ & ‘Metal’.  ‘Fire’ refers to the functional activity of the Heart and ‘Metal’ to the Lungs.  It is therefore said that ‘Fire’ (Heart/Small Intestine) is the ‘mother’ of ‘Earth’ (Stomach/Spleen), and ‘Metal’ (Lungs/Large Intestine) is the ‘son’ of ‘Earth’.
The logic of all this, which at the end of the day is only a way of explaining and remembering things, is that an over-bearing, over-controlling mother (in this case the Heart) will sap the energy of the child – Stomach/Spleen (taking away the child’s ability to make decisions etc.).  An over-bearing, demanding child (in this case Lungs), will therefore sap it’s mother’s (Stomach/Spleen) strength.

In practical terms.
So, if your Digestive system is weak, it could be because the Heart (mother) is too active, but could also be because the Lungs (son) are too active.  On the other hand, if your Digestive system is too active, it could be because either or both of the Elements on either side are too weak!
This is simplistic (you can see from the diagram that there are other aspects involved), but it demonstrates one use of 5 Elements theory which at root is only a functional model, the aim of which is to understand the energetics of the organs in the body.

Why do qigong?
Apart from the TCM reasons above which are about making the organs work together harmoniously – rather like servicing the engine of your car, Qigong is also about enhancing your body’s potential and ability, as well as being about repairing damage, not only within the organs, but also within the skeletal structure.

And the twisting & stretching?
If you have a wet towel and want to squeeze the water out of it, you roll it up and then twist it.
When you use the same concept with your limbs or body, you achieve exactly the same thing; you move the fluids within the body by compressing the tissues.  Simultaneously, the twisting expands and lengthens the tissues, veins, nerve fibres, lymphatic connections, muscles, tendons, ligaments, and fascia.
You move the blood and lymph, shunting toxins down the pipelines to be squeezed from the body, whilst at the same time, combined with conscious breathing which supplies fresh oxygen to your blood, the renewed blood fills those spaces created by the removal of the toxins.  In TCM, blood and Qi work closely together; it’s not for nothing that we refer to this substance as your ‘life blood’.

It’s not the key to the universe, but then again, if everything is a microcosm, maybe it is!  So keep doing lots of Qigong!
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James Drewe teaches Taijiquan and qigong in both London and in Kent. Details of weekly classes can be found on the website, and there are classes for 2-person Taijiquan one Saturday a month.

CONTACT:
http://www.taiji.co.uk
http://www.qigonghealth.co.uk
Email: taijiandqigong@gmail.com
Phone: 07836-710281 or 020-8883 3308

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Pulling up Your Undercarriage.

The perineum.
Between the thighs, approximately midway between the genitals and the anus, is the midpoint of the muscles that can be used to help solve a wide variety of health issues.
This is the centre of your pelvic floor, and is important in helping prostate and incontinence problems, as well as problems with some types of hernia and prolapse, and even haemorrhoids.

Feeling it.
If you are unsure where it is, it’s the same muscle you use when trying to stop urination in mid-flow, as well as the one that women practise using both pre- and then postnatally to help the recovery of the pelvic floor.

Anatomical location
The muscle is connected from the front of the pelvis (symphysis pubis) to the tip of the spine and sacrum, and sideways to the lower outside borders of the pelvis (see diagram) – the sitting bones. This is a little basic, but is good enough for our purposes.

The pelvic floor’s function.
It’s function is to hold the bowel, digestive, and reproductive organs in position (intestines, womb, uterus, bladder).  Without it, gravity would allow those organs to drop between the thighs.   It’s the bottom of the shopping bag, and needs to be strong.  It’s important in controlling the bladder and bowels, as well as helping with sexual function and fertility.  It is also important in the relationship between the spine and the pelvis, and when used correctly, can help with back & pelvic pain.  There is also a relationship between correct pelvic floor use and breathing.

Ageing.
We’re all getting older, and incontinence can be a problem for both men and women.   Having good pelvic floor muscle tone can stop that problem by helping with sphincter control, but you have to practise.

But you can also damage the pelvic floor….
Pregnancy and childbirth for women
Straining on the toilet
Chronic coughing
Heavy lifting
High impact exercise
Obesity

A couple of points:
Don’t pull up the undercarriage without breathing, preferably abdominally.
Avoid gripping the gluteal muscles (muscles in the buttocks).

How does this relate to Tai Chi & Qigong?
This group of muscles is constantly used when doing both tai chi & qigong, and closely connected to the pelvic tilt (see previous blog).   When you tilt your pelvis, you simultaneously need to lift the pelvic floor.
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James Drewe teaches Taijiquan and qigong in both London and in Kent. Details of weekly classes can be found on the website, and there are classes for 2-person Taijiquan one Saturday a month.

CONTACT:
http://www.taiji.co.uk
http://www.qigonghealth.co.uk
Email: taijiandqigong@gmail.com
Phone: 07836-710281 or 020-8883 3308

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